Thursday Miscellany

Photo by Juliane Liebermann on Unsplash

From Capitol Hill, Govexec reports that yesterday, “a Senate panel advanced President Biden’s pick [Jason Miller] to be deputy director for management for the Office of Management and Budget to the full chamber. Today, Fierce Healthcare reports Chiquita Brooks-LaSure’s confirmation hearing to be Centers for Medicare Service administrator before the Senate Finance Committee. “The hearing didn’t highlight any major opposition from Republicans to her nomination, likely signaling her confirmation as the head of CMS.”

From the Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause front, Healthcare Dive discusses “What Happens Next, A call by regulators to stop J&J vaccinations won’t dramatically disrupt U.S. supply. But changes in labeling are possible, as is a renewed debate over vaccine hesitancy.” The Wall Street Journal adds that

A study by the University of Oxford found the risk of rare but sometimes-deadly blood clotting is roughly eight to 10 times greater in Covid-19 sufferers than among people who have received any of the first three Western-developed vaccines widely available. The study, involving vaccinations from Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE, another from Moderna Inc. and one from AstraZeneca PLC, adds to competing evidence related to blood clotting that regulators and governments may need to take into account as they weigh continued deployment of vaccines

While the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was not included in this study, the Astra-Zeneca vaccine uses the same adenovirus technology as the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

In other COVID-19 vaccine news, the HHS Office of Inspector General issued a warning that provider must not charge patients for the COVID-19 vaccine.


OIG is aware of complaints by patients about charges by providers when getting their COVID-19 vaccines. Providers that charge impermissible fees must refund them and ensure that individuals are not charged fees for the COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine administration in the future. Consistent with the CDC Vaccination Program, providers are permitted to bill third-party payers (such as Medicare, Medicaid, the HRSA COVID-19 Uninsured Program, or a private insurer) for an administration fee, in accordance with the payer’s applicable billing rules.

In FEHB news, today the Office of Personnel Management issued a benefit administration letter to employing agencies and a letter to FEHB carriers instructing them to tighten up on the process of adding family members to an FEHBP enrollment. For the employing offices —

An employing office must require proof of family member eligibility for coverage through the FEHB Program for: 

• new employees during their initial opportunity to enroll (IOE) 

• employees requesting FEHB changes due to all other QLEs2 

Due to the large volume of transactions during the annual Federal Benefits Open Season, employing offices may, but are not required to, verify family member eligibility. 

When reviewing a new family member’s eligibility, employing offices may take this opportunity to verify the eligibility of family members currently enrolled who have not previously been verified. 

For the carriers — “Before adding a family member to an existing Self and Family enrollment, an FEHB Carrier must require that the enrollee provide proof of that family member’s eligibility for coverage through the FEHB Program.” In the middle of the last decade, OPM considered but never implemented an audit of family member eligibility records.

From the Centers for Disease Control reports front

  • Health Day informs us that “Emergency department visits were lower during December 2020 to January 2021 compared with prepandemic levels one year earlier, according to research published in the April 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. * * * The researchers found that after an initial decrease during March to April 2020, there was an increase in emergency department visits through July 2020, but at levels below those during 2019; during December 2020 to January 2021, there was a decrease of 25 percent in visits compared with prepandemic levels.”
  • The New York Times reports that

More than 87,000 Americans died of drug overdoses over the 12-month period that ended in September, according to preliminary federal data, eclipsing the toll from any year since the opioid epidemic began in the 1990s.

The surge represents an increasingly urgent public health crisis, one that has drawn less attention and fewer resources while the nation has battled the coronavirus pandemic. Deaths from overdoses started rising again in the months leading up to the coronavirus pandemic — after dropping slightly in 2018 for the first time in decades — and it is hard to gauge just how closely the two phenomena are linked. But the pandemic unquestionably exacerbated the trend, which grew much worse last spring: The biggest jump in overdose deaths took place in April and May, when fear and stress were rampant, job losses were multiplying and the strictest lockdown measures were in effect

That’s quite sad.

In other news —

  • Becker’s Hospital Review informs us that “UnitedHealth Group posted nearly $5 billion in profit for the first quarter of 2021 as its UnitedHealthcare and Optum businesses continue to grow.”
  • STAT News offers an interesting report on the burgeoning market for increasingly inexpensive continuous glucose monitors for folks with Diabetes I.

Glucose monitors are becoming the backbone of a new movement in consumer tech — one that so far is outpacing the evidence. “You kind of have this dichotomy with the perceived value of CGM,” said Susan Schembre, a researcher at the University of Arizona who has studied the use of CGMs in healthy people. “We have the consumers really driving the market on one end, and then the science kind of resisting it on the other.”

Eventually, the devices and the evidence will converge. Already, clinical CGMs have expanded from their initial patient population: Doctors regularly prescribe them to people who manage their type 2 diabetes with insulin, and sometimes to help type 2 patients tweak their habits and avoid going on medication. Manufacturers are planning for a future in which patients use the devices to both treat and prevent metabolic issues — dramatically increasing their market share. Consumer tech companies are looking for their slice of the pie.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *