Happy New Fiscal Year

Today, October 1, 2020, is the beginning of the new 2021 federal fiscal year and the fourth calendar quarter of 2020. Federal News Network reports that the President signed the compromise continuing resolution into law at 1 am this morning. The federal government is now funded through December 11, 2020.

The Washington Post reminds us that

Most federal employees [became] eligible Thursday [October 1] for paid parental leave, a benefit valued at about $1 billion a year and one of the most significant expansions of their benefits since the creation of unpaid parental leave more than 25 years ago. The new entitlement will allow employees to take paid time off for part or all of 12 weeks over a 12-month period, effective with births, adoptions or foster placements that occur Thursday and after. Previously, employees could take 12 weeks of unpaid time available under the Family and Medical Leave Act.

On the COVID-19 front —

  • The Wall Street Journal provides operational background on the current Phase III COVID-19 vaccine trials.
  • The Department of Health and Human Services announced an agreement with the Rockefeller Foundation “to identify and share effective approaches for using rapid point-of-care (POC) antigen tests to screen for COVID-19 in communities, with a focus on safely reopening K-12 schools. The partnership establishes a pilot program with select cities and states in The Rockefeller Foundation’s Testing Solutions Group (TSG), a network of public officials devoted to rapidly scaling COVID-19 testing, tracing, and tracking in their communities.”
  • STAT News discusses the somber connection between diabetes and COVID-19.

Data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than three-quarters of people who died from Covid-19 had at least one preexisting condition. Overall, diabetes was noted as an underlying condition for approximately 4 in 10 patients. Among people younger than 65 who died from the infection, about half had diabetes.

[Moreover,] Juliana Chan, director of the Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, said the pandemic has intertwined with and exposed two other widespread problems: diabetes and disparities triggered by social determinants of health.

“What we are seeing is nothing new, but it is really just on a massive and global scale,” she said in an interview. “I hope that there is something positive out of this, that people understand that we are hit by three epidemics.”

  • The U.S. Department of Labor issued additional FAQs “regarding the need to report employees’ in-patient hospitalizations and fatalities resulting from work-related cases of the coronavirus.”

Because October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, the FEHBlog wishes to point out this Health IT Security report that

From October 2019 to July 2020, Microsoft data shows hackers have rapidly improved the sophistication and increased the frequency of cyberattacks. And when it comes to incident response engagements, ransomware attacks were the most common cause. The report follows reports that the Universal Health Services health system is currently recovering from what appears to be one of the biggest ransomware attacks in recent history. Further, nearly a dozen healthcare entities in the past month have either faced similar incidents or saw their data leaked online by ransomware threat actors.

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