Midweek Update

FCW.com reports that “The Senior Executives Association, which represents members of the Senior Executive Service and other federal mangers, is looking for sweeping change to the government’s human resources organization and practice.” Here’s a link to a the SEA’s report titled “Transforming the Governance of Federal Human Capital Management.” Of note, check out their recommendation for the OPM group that manages our beloved FEHBP:

The Healthcare and Insurance enrollment function should be assessed to determine if there would be benefits to reengineering and/or outsourcing. The federal government already does this with its vision and dental program (FEDVIP), which is administered by BENEFEDS. Reengineering should, as needed, focus on customer service and cost savings through efficiency. The nation’s largest employers, such as Walmart, outsource their benefits administration, as do most private-sector organizations. Once reengineering is complete, service level agreement and transactional cost ratios should be established. OPM could then explore if it is an appropriate candidate for outsourcing. If it is determined that outsourcing is more effective, OPM should maintain policy oversight and HC data ownership and control.

It’s not the first time that the FEHBlog has heard this recommendation made.

On the innovation front —

  • The FEHBlog was wondering today what was going on with his preferred candidate for COVID-19 treatment, convalescent plasma. Wonder and you shall receive for the Wall Street Journal advises tonight that

The Food and Drug Administration is nearing a decision to authorize emergency use of antibody-rich blood plasma from recovered Covid-19 patients for treating people infected with the coronavirus, people familiar with the matter said. The authorization could come as soon as next week, according to the people, though the agency could also decide to delay a decision. The designation could open the way for faster and wider access to one of the most promising treatments for Covid-19 patients. Only a Gilead Sciences Inc. antiviral drug known as remdesivir [currently] carries the designation.

  • Employee Benefit News informs us that

CVS Health is expanding their voluntary benefits to tackle mental health and anxiety treatment with a new digital offering.

The company added Daylight, an app that uses cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to combat anxiety, to its Point Solutions Management lineup. Both employer clients and CVS employees will have access to the app.

CVS looked to one of its existing partners — Big Health, the makers of the digital sleep benefit, Sleepio — for its newest offering. Daylight uses AI to make personalized recommendations on therapy exercises for users experiencing anxiety and stress.

On the Medicare front —

  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced today that “The average basic Medicare Part D premium will be $30.50 in 2021. The 2021 and 2020 average basic premiums are the second lowest and lowest, respectively, average basic premiums in Part D since 2013. This trend of lower Part D premiums, which have decreased by 12 percent since 2017.” Of course, Medicare Part D covers outpatient prescription drugs.
  • Forbes reports that

Americans who depend on Medicare Part B are accustomed to a yearly cost increase for their coverage. The Senate Republican proposals for a second stimulus package would freeze 2021 Medicare Part B premiums at 2020 levels. Negotiations between Republican and Democratic leaders continue in Congress, with multiple potential provisions for a second stimulus package on the table. Both sides have indicated they would like to pass a new stimulus bill before Congress departs for a month-long break on Aug 7.

In other news —

  • The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) released today the HHS Secretary’s Report on Addressing Surprise Billing. Here’s Healthcare Dive’s take on the report. “HHS on Wednesday prodded Congress to pass legislation that bans surprise medical billing but did not take on stance on the best method to do so or endorse any particular bill.”
  • HHS also released “a new report showing the dramatic utilization trends of telehealth services for primary care delivery in Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare in the early days of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The report analyzes claims data from January through early June.” Here’s is Healthcare Dive’s take on that report. “Almost half — 43.5% — of all Medicare primary care visits were being conducted through telehealth in April. That’s up from just 0.1% in February.” Wow.
  • Finally, Federal News Network informs us that

Four months after Congress approved a $10 billion loan for the Postal Service under the CARES Act, the Treasury Department and USPS leadership have struck a deal on the terms of that loan. According to the terms of the loan, released by top Democrats in the House and Senate, USPS has agreed to give Treasury access to its biggest negotiated service agreements with industry partners. The Postal Service will have access to the loan to fund operating expenses until March 27, 2022, but Treasury won’t advance any of the funds if USPS has a cash balance of more than $8 billion. In addition, USPS has agreed to give Treasury monthly reports on its cash flow and year-over-year changes in volume for its major lines of business, as well as changes in revenue and expenses.

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