Midweek update

From the COLA front, FedWeek informs us that

  • A federal retirement COLA of 5.9 percent will be paid in January to those retired under CSRS and 4.9 percent to those retired under FERS who are eligible for COLAs, increases that have been neared in recent decades only twice.
  • The announcement follows completion of the count toward that adjustment with release of the September inflation figure on Wednesday (October 13), which was up 0.4 percent. * * *
  • A 5.9 increase also will be paid on Social Security benefits. That’s primarily of interest to FERS retirees, for whom Social Security is a basic part of the retirement benefit, but also of interest to CSRS Offset retirees who have Social Security coverage as part of their benefit. Also, some “pure” CSRS retirees qualify for Social Security through from military service or earnings covered under that system before, after—and in some cases from outside earnings during—their CSRS working years. In many cases those benefits are reduced by the “windfall elimination provision” however. * * *
  • Congress appears to be on track to accept a raise payout by default of President Biden’s recommendation for a 2.7 percent average raise, with 2.2 percentage points to be paid across the board and the funds for the remainder divided up as locality pay.

From the Delta variant front, MedPage Today offers an interesting article on the efforts of primary care providers to convince their reluctant patients to receive a COVID vaccine.

[Australian social psychologist Matthew] Hornsey [observed] that in a world where the institutional memory of pandemics has been lost, only the perception of vaccine risk remains. With adverse effects making headlines daily, even in mainstream outlets, it’s hard to promote a message of safety.

David M. Oshinsky, PhD, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and professor of medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City, noted the sense of euphoria with the polio vaccine, dubbed at the time as “the peoples’ vaccine.”

Well put.

Also, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) staff today released their vaccination advisory committee briefing book on the one dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine. According to the Wall Street Journal’s report

A booster of Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine showed signs of significantly bolstering the immune defenses of study subjects, federal health regulators said Wednesday.  The regulators cautioned, however, that data was limited and that they had to rely on J&J’s own analysis for some of the study findings, rather than conducting their own.

The committee will take up the Modern booster tomorrow and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as well as the topic of mixing and matching different COVID boosters on Friday.

From the telehealth front, Employee Benefit News reports that

Telehealth providers have found that their platforms are uniquely suited to address gaps in pediatric behavioral healthcare and are expanding their services to adolescents. Brightline, launched just before the pandemic, offers an “on-ramp” to behavioral health services, Allen says. The platform does an intake assessment and then provides education and 30-minute coaching services for parents and their children.

“Kids are actually more resilient using technology than we expected, and now there’s a strong preference for virtual first behavioral healthcare, because of the privacy and the comfort of delivering care in your home,” Allen says. “If Brightline hired every single pediatric therapist in the entire United States, we would still have a national shortage, so we instead use these tools to figure out what’s an appropriate care pathway and measure whether they’re working.”

From the Rx coverage front, STAT News informs us that Pfizer is backing up one of its expensive lung cancer drugs Xalkori with a insurance company backed warranty.

“In reality, this is for Medicare patients,” said Susan Raiola, president of Real Endpoints, an advisory and analytics firm that tracks reimbursement issues. Why? Medicare co-pays are used toward the so-called donut hole, the term used to describe a temporary limit on what Medicare will pay to cover a drug. The co-pays can add up, though, making refunds more desirable. * * *

To what extent warranties may become commonplace remains to be seen. But the concept may find takers among drug makers marketing high-priced treatments that cost $1 million or more, because winning reimbursement is challenging, according to Emad Samad, president of Octaviant Financial, a firm that is promoting the use of warranties in the pharmaceutical industry.

“So far, no one else has done this,” Samad said of the Pfizer program. “But where warranties will really come into play will be with high-cost treatments, such as gene and cell therapies. These companies will have to change commercial paths with these $1 million to $3 million drugs. They need tools – such as even more innovative warranty structures – so that payers can get comfortable with the varied outcomes potentially transformative therapies could have.”

From the medical devices front, Healthcare Dive informs us that the “FDA has awarded the latest crop of breakthrough device designations, granting regulatory privileges to investigational products including liquid biopsy tests for Alzheimer’s disease and bladder cancer. Check out the list.

From the medical research front, the National Institutes of Health announced that “A commonly available oral diuretic pill approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may be a potential candidate for an Alzheimer’s disease treatment for those who are at genetic risk, according to findings published in Nature Aging. The research included analysis showing that those who took bumetanide — a commonly used and potent diuretic(link is external) — had a significantly lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease compared to those not taking the drug.” Fingers crossed.

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