Midweek update

Photo by Piron Guillaume on Unsplash

Yesterday, “at her first meeting of the Chief Human Capital Officers (CHCO) Council, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director and Council Chair, Kiran Ahuja, announced that the CHCO Council’s functions will be restored to OPM, after the Council’s leadership and administration were bifurcated between OPM and General Services Administration (GSA) since 2019.”  Sic semper attempted GSA merger.

The North Carolina Attorney General announced “a historic $26 billion agreement that will help bring desperately needed relief to people across the country who are struggling with opioid addiction. The agreement includes Cardinal, McKesson, and AmerisourceBergen – the nation’s three major pharmaceutical distributors – and Johnson & Johnson, which manufactured and marketed opioids. The agreement also requires significant industry changes that will help prevent this type of crisis from ever happening again. The agreement would resolve investigations and litigation over the companies’ roles in creating and fueling the opioid epidemic. State negotiations were led by Attorneys General Josh Stein (NC) and Herbert Slatery (TN) and the attorneys general from California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas.”

Healthcare Dive informs us that “Anthem, the nation’s second largest insurer [and a Blue Cross licensee], saw robust membership growth during the second quarter, adding 1.9 million members, a 4.4% increase over the prior-year period. The growth was fueled entirely by government programs, largely Medicaid and Medicare, while commercial membership declined slightly.  The Indianapolis-based insurer raised its forecast for the full year as its performance in the second quarter outperformed expectations. Even though COVID-19 cases continue to rise due to the delta variant and non-COVID-19 care resumes, Anthem’s medical loss ratio of 86.8% came in below company and analyst expectations.”

Healthcare Dive further reports that “Americans’ medical debt may have reached $140 billion last year, significantly higher than past estimates and outweighing all other types of personal debt in the U.S., according to a new study published in JAMA. Researchers analyzed a tenth of all credit reports from rating agency TransUnion to find nearly one in five Americans had medical debt in collections in June last year — more than any other type. Debt was significantly more concentrated in states that had yet to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. The analysis reflects care provided prior to COVID-19, but early data shows the pandemic has likely only exacerbated the perennial issue of medical debt in the U.S.” The FEHBlog is surprised that one decade into the Affordable Care Act this issue has not diminished.

In another downbeat but important story, AHIP tells us that “price gouging on COVID-19 tests by certain providers continues to be a widespread problem, threatening patients’ ability to get the testing they need.”

The FEHBlog also ran across the following three interesting articles in Forbes:

  • “Most hospital executives will say it’s impossible to run a business on Medicare rates. The government health insurance program for seniors pays less for services than it costs to deliver them and private insurance has to make up the difference. But Eren Bali doesn’t buy the cost-shifting argument. The serial entrepreneur who grew up in rural southeast Turkey believes the issue isn’t the rates but an outdated system using old technology. “There’s so much waste because providers are so used to charging through the roof in this country, they’ve never thought about being efficient,” says Bali, 37, the CEO and cofounder of Carbon Health.” This article is a day brightener.
  • “UnitedHealth Group is rolling out an increasing number of partnerships to “address health equity challenges” across the U.S.” The article adds that “UnitedHealth’s effort comes as the company and rivals including Anthem, CVS Health’s Aetna health plan unit, Humana and others address social determinants of health as insurers intensify strategies to reduce costs and improve outcomes beyond covering traditional medical treatments.”
  • “The coronavirus pandemic forced many hospitals to confront an uncomfortable truth: they were sitting on troves of patient data but, despite tens of millions of dollars spent on electronic health records and IT infrastructure, couldn’t extract useful insights to help treat the virus ravaging the wards. This experience was the tipping point that pushed a group of 17 hospitals to come together, including three new members announced this week, to raise $95 million for a startup called Truveta.” The article adds that “The aim of the company is to enable hospitals to monetize patient data that has been de-identified in ways that may both improve existing treatments and develop new ones. With the addition of Texas-based Baylor Scott & White Health, Maryland-based MedStar Health and Texas Health Resources, the hospital-governed Truveta now says it represents organizations that provide 15% of patient care in the United States. The Seattle, Washington-based startup is helmed not by a veteran of the healthcare world, but by former Microsoft executive Terry Myerson, who’s better known for his work on Windows and Xbox.”

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