Monday Roundup

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The FEHBlog should rename Monday’s column COVID-19 Vaccine Good News because for the fourth Monday in a row that news leads the FEHBlog.

Healthcare Dive reports that “Moderna on Monday released new study results showing the [messenger RNA based] coronavirus vaccine it developed with U.S. government scientists to be 94.1% effective at preventing COVID-19 in a large clinical trial, data the company will use to request emergency approval” from the Food and Drug Administration.

According to Moderna’s announcement

[P]rimary analysis was based on 196 cases [of COVID-19 within the test group of 30,000 individuals, half of whom received the vaccine and the other half of whom received a placebo]. 185 cases of COVID-19 were observed in the placebo group versus 11 cases observed in the mRNA-1273 [vaccine] group, resulting in a point estimate of vaccine efficacy of 94.1%. A secondary endpoint analyzed severe cases of COVID-19 and included 30 severe cases (as defined in the study protocol) in this analysis. All 30 cases occurred in the placebo group and none in the mRNA-1273 vaccinated group. There was one COVID-19-related death in the study to date, which occurred in the placebo group.

Efficacy was consistent across age, race and ethnicity, and gender demographics. The 196 COVID-19 cases included 33 older adults (ages 65+) and 42 participants identifying as being from diverse communities (including 29 Hispanic or LatinX, 6 Black or African Americans, 4 Asian Americans and 3 multiracial participants).

The safety profile of the Phase 3 study of mRNA-1273 was previously described on November 16. A continuous review of safety data is ongoing and no new serious safety concerns have been identified by the Company. Based on prior analysis, the most common solicited adverse reactions included injection site pain, fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, headache, and erythema/redness at the injection site. Solicited adverse reactions increased in frequency and severity in the mRNA-1273 group after the second dose.

Healthcare Dive adds that

Moderna said it will submit on Monday [today] an application for emergency use authorization in the U.S. and for conditional marketing approval in Europe. The FDA will convene a panel of independent advisers to publicly review Moderna’s application, likely on Dec. 17. * * *

An authorization for either vaccine [Pfizer – BioNTech or Moderna] would kick off a mass immunization campaign in the U.S. But supplies of each shot will be extremely limited for months. Moderna expects to have just 20 million doses available in the U.S. this year, and between 500 million to 1 billion in 2021. [Two doses protect one person. The Wall Street Journal notes that Pfizer and BioNTech said they would deliver about 25 million doses by year’s end, potentially enough for about 12.5 million people in the U.S.]

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee will meet on Tuesday to vote on how vaccine doses will allocated. Healthcare workers on the front lines of the pandemic will likely be vaccinated first.

The Wall Street Journal expands on this last point:

Expected to be first in line: health workers treating coronavirus patients and in something of a surprise, nursing-home residents.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the outside medical experts advising the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will vote on who should get the first doses, after discussing plans for distributing the shots and monitoring for potential side effects.

In other news

  • The FEHBlog overlooked the CDC’s Antibiotic Awareness Week which was held from November 18 – 24. Better late than never right. This is an important public health cause and the link provides useful resources.
  • The FEHBlog noticed a Health Payer Intelligence article about a health plan that “has reduced out-of-pocket healthcare spending by collectively giving members millions of dollars in rewards through their My Health Pays program.” The FEHBlog did a little investigative work and he discovered that the health plan in question participates in the ACA marketplace. It is crazy that individual health plans have no limits on wellness reward uses while group health plans generally must limit their wellness rewards to reimbursing medical services and supplies or Medicare premiums. Congress should level the playing field.

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