Monday Roundup

Photo by Sven Read on Unsplash

In COVID-19 vaccine news —

  • The American Hospital Association has a COVID-19 vaccine resources and information website.
  • PharmaManufacturing is reporting that ” Pfizer’s CEO recently stated that the company could be ready to submit data from a late-stage trial of its coronavirus vaccine by the end of October — but experts are urging the company to slow its roll. According to Bloomberg Law, more than 60 bioethicists and researchers have penned a letter asking Pfizer to delay data reporting until November.” Why not let the Food and Drug Administration do its job?

In COVID-19 rapid testing news, HHS announced today a detailed “national distribution plan for the Abbott BinaxNOW Ag Card rapid test to assist Governors’ efforts to continue to safely reopen their states. BinaxNOW is a unique testing option to provide support to K-12 teachers and students, higher education, critical infrastructure, first responders, and other priorities as governors deem fit. The BinaxNOW rapid test – the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-authorized antigen rapid point-of-care test that does not require an instrument – is easy to use, will produce COVID-19 test results in 15 minutes, and costs $5. * * * The Federal government purchased these Abbott BinaxNOW diagnostic tests on August 27, 2020, to ensure equitable distribution of the first 150 million units – one day after an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) was issued by the FDA to ensure they would be expeditiously distributed to vulnerable populations as quickly as possible.

In other news —

  • The Centers for Disease Control reported today about COVID-19 trends among school age children in our country. “Since March, 277,285 COVID-19 cases in children have been reported [out of seven million in total]. COVID-19 incidence among adolescents aged 12–17 years was approximately twice that in children aged 5–11 years.”
  • Healio reports on the multiple uses of telehealth beyond acute primary care. “[T]elehealth has been routinely incorporated in specialties such as psychiatry and asthma/allergy care, even prior to the COVID-19 era [‘PC”]. * * * Further, telemedicine allows for triage of patients with COVID-19 symptoms without requiring face-to-face visits to help direct next steps for testing and treatment. Telehealth can be effectively incorporated into oncology care — provided thoughtful and appropriate measures are taken.”
  • There has been a lot of press about the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court following the sad occasion of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death. It is quite likely that Judge Barrett will be sitting on the Supreme Court when the California v. Texas case is argued on November 10. Speculation is rife about this development and it is truly unfortunate that the Trump Administration is now siding with the States opposing the law’s constitutionality in the California v. Texas case. In the FEHBlog’s opinion, the position against the law’s constitutionality is a weak cup of tea. The FEHBlog is confident that the Supreme Court opted to hear the case to end this litigation in favor of the ACA’s general constitutionality. Congress obviously did not intend to render the ACA unconstitutional by zeroing out the individual mandate. The American Prospect observes

The whole legal argument [against the ACA’s constitutionality] depends on the fact that Republicans used reconciliation to pass the 2017 tax bill through the Senate with a simple majority. Due to the restrictions around reconciliation, Republicans couldn’t technically repeal the mandate in total, instead just lowering the penalty to nothing. The case effectively goes away if Congress either adds back in a penalty (even of just one cent), or just officially repeals the mandate, thereby severing it from the whole health care law.

Trying to bring back a penalty is a terrible option. The mandate is deeply unpopular, and it would be easy for Senate Republicans to oppose that move. What’s more, in the months since the mandate penalty went away, we’ve learned that it wasn’t as necessary to making the Obamacare system work as Democrats insisted in 2009 and 2010. Fully repealing the individual mandate, on the other hand, is an easy fight to win, as well as good policy. It is generally bad to have unenforced laws on the books.

Congress should take this action now by enacting an individual mandate repeal just as it repealed other ACA taxes in 2019. This is not to suggest that Congressional action is the only step that could save the law. But it would short circuit this craziness.

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